#MentalMatters

Monday 28th October #MentalMatters

Infertility is a disease that is not only about your physical health, but one that can affect your mental health too. It is so important to look after and be kind to yourself. Which is why on our #MentalMatters day, the kick-starter of National Fertility Awareness Week, we will share tips from mental health experts, as well as testimonials from real people within our community. This day is not just about raising awareness about fertility and mental health but providing our network with solutions to help you navigate through this chapter in your life.

Trying to conceive can be a lonely and isolating place

As is the way for many, my fertility struggles crept up on me. I slid into being 1 in 8 when I wasn’t looking. I’d never had any reason to think there’d be a problem, my periods had always been regular and I was fit and healthy. I have curvy hips which once prompted a friend to say ‘You look like you’d get pregnant easily’. This made me smile at the time, as we’d only just embarked on our trying to conceive journey and I believed it’d be true. Each month we’d eagerly await the time we could reliably test, analyzing every possible early pregnancy symptom, which cruelly are very similar to symptoms of your period arriving. Each month we felt just a little crushed at the sight of that one line. Were we doing it right? Why wasn’t it working?

Read Tori’s Blog in full.

Alex’s story – September 2019

I have always known that conceiving would be difficult. I have two hidden disabilities: a complex endocrine condition, which affects sex hormones (growth hormones as a child), cortisol (stress hormone), and salt retention; and Crohns disease, which is inflammation of the bowel. I take six medications every day including two steroids, and have had quite a bit of surgery over the years to manage both conditions.

Read Alex’s Blog in full.

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